Guggenheim features Fleshcore, a new work by Ryan McNamara commissioned by the museum’s Work and Process program

From the Guggenheim:

Ryan McNamara’s “Fleshcore” is a video work that visualizes the spatial and temporal separation among individuals during this time of crisis.
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In honor of Pride, Works and Process will premiere newly commissioned video performances from June 20–29, highlighting creative expressions by LGBTQ+ artists.
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Artist note: “Every morning I take a blue oblong pill. It’s an antiviral medication that protects me from a virus I have feared my whole life. The virus has a taste for intravenous penetration. Now I am separated from my people because of a new virus that thrives on surfaces and floats across the air we breathe. The actions I learned for one I have to relearn or unlearn for the other. I have a touch anxiety.
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For this video, I worked with nine performers who are currently scattered across the globe. These are people I’ve worked with for over a decade. It was a nice way to check in with extended family during quarantine. I rehearsed with each of them for three hours via FaceTime. The choreography involves the performers touching their own body. This project expanded my ideas of self-touch, for example, becoming aware of the touch that occurs via blinking, my upper lid briefly making contact with my lower lid. By layering the footage, I could have the performers touch each other, if only on your monitor. The screen becomes a petri dish of forbidden connection.
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I created a new musical score, mixing in samples of the song that plays when you’re on hold with the New York Department of Labor Unemployment Contact Line, a song that hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers have listened to for hours during the pandemic (myself included)."